Mixed Berry Flaugnarde

The Flaugnarde comes from a region in France called Périgord. It’s a thick custard dessert, reminiscent of a French clafoutis. This particular recipes celebrates summer berries. The sweet and tart elements of the berries mix perfectly with the creamy rich custard. Warm or cold, this dessert is heavenly.

This recipe comes from one of my favorite food bloggers ever, David Lebovitz. He’s a San Francisco expat, living in Paris as a Food Blogger and Cookbook Author. I love his recipes for so many reasons, but mainly for his gift for baking with seasonal fruit.

When I was a kid, I followed my sister’s lead when it came to fruit in desserts. I remember her always saying, “A pile of hot fruit does not count as dessert.” I was loyal to these words. Loyal until I moved to France in my early 20s. Everything changed when I realized how delicious a perfectly ripe pear tasted in a Tarte aux Poires (French Pear Tart).

David Lebovitz is able to take any seasonal produce offering and transform it into a dessert that neither takes away it’s unique flavor nor overhighlights it. So you’re left with a perfect harmony of ingredients.

I’d never heard of a Flaugnarde before but I’ve found that it’s essentially the same thing as a Clafoutis. (Check out my clafoutis recipes: Cherry ClafoutisApple Clafoutis, and Baked Pear Custard). And the texture is very close to that of a Puff Babies (Dutch Babies), although a Flaugnarde is sweeter in flavor. Flaugnarde’s comes from a region in France called Périgord. The unique texture is like a thick custard rather than a cake or torte. David uses a variety of French plums in his recipe, as I have with nectarines in this Plum & Nectarine Flaugnarde but it’s just as good with a mix of fresh summer berries. The berries are sweet and fruity which pair really nicely with the rich and creamy custard base.

This recipe comes together in mere minutes. You can put it in the oven when your guests arrive and it’ll be ready to eat for dessert. It only takes 20 minutes to bake, and much less to prepare. It’s rustic, traditional, and very French. The only un-French thing about it is that it’s fuss-free. Enjoy!

Mixed Berry Flaugnarde

The Flaugnarde comes from a region in France called Périgord. It’s a thick custard dessert, reminiscent of a French clafoutis. This particular recipe celebrates summer berries. The sweet and tart elements of the berries mix perfectly with the creamy rich custard. Warm or cold, this dessert is heavenly.
Prep Time 10 mins
Cook Time 20 mins
Total Time 30 mins
Course Dessert
Cuisine French
Servings 6 Servings

Ingredients
  

  • 1 ½ cups Mixed fresh berries, halved if large just enough to cover the bottom of the pan
  • 3 Eggs room temperature
  • ½ cup Flour
  • ¼ cup Sugar, plus a spoonful to sprinkle over the top after baking
  • Pinch Salt
  • ¼ cup Heavy cream
  • ¾ cup Whole milk
  • 1 ½ tbsp. Brandy (or kirsch, cognac, or dark rum)
  • ½ tsp. Vanilla

Instructions
 

  • Preheat oven to 400F. Grease a 2-quart (or 8×8-inch) baking dish with butter. Place the berries evenly over the bottom of the dish.
  • In a medium bowl, whisk together the eggs, flour, sugar, salt, and heavy cream. Gradually whisk in the milk, brandy, and vanilla ,until no lumps remain. Pour the custard over the berries.
  • Bake for 20 minutes on the middle oven rack until the custard is just set in the center. Remove from oven and sprinkle with a spoonful of sugar. Enjoy warm or at room temperature. Store leftovers in refrigerator.

Notes

Adapted from David Lebovitz’s blog.
Keyword baked custard, Baked French fries, Berry Custard, Berry custard dessert, blueberries, Clafoutis, Flaugnarde, French dessert
The Flaugnarde comes from a region in France called Périgord. It’s a thick custard dessert, reminiscent of a French clafoutis. This particular recipes celebrates summer berries. The sweet and tart elements of the berries mix perfectly with the creamy rich custard. Warm or cold, this dessert is heavenly.

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